full of juice pt. 1

☭☭☭ BLACK SQUARE ☭☭☭

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  1. Name: Raver
    Artist: The Scientists
    Album: Heading for a Trauma

    suicidewatch:

    The Scientists “Raver” (Alan Vega cover)

    Go Go Raver Go,

    Go Go Raver Go,

    Go Go Raver Go.

  2. The inimitable Van Dyke Parks on The Beatles (‘I hold nothing against them, I mean they’re handsome’), Dennis Wilson (‘I don’t mean to characterise this guy, he’s got a lot of meat’) and the Beach (‘you know where the land comes down to the water?’).

  3. globalwarmist:

Earlier this year, London’s Tate Modern acquired “Sabra and Shatila Massacre” (1982-83), an epic mural-sized drawing by pioneering Iraqi artist Dia al-Azzawi. Sprawling as it is towering and engulfing, the artist began the massive work after news surfaced that between two and three thousand Palestinian and Lebanese civilians were strategically murdered in and around the refugee camps of southern Beirut in 1982. While creating “Sabra and Shatila Massacre,” al-Azzawi was also moved by Jean Genet’s “Four Hours in Shatila,” a written dispatch of the hell on earth that was the site of this civil-war era carnage, the violent details of which are impossible to take in without periodically searching for respite by turning away from the page.
- Dia al-Azzawi’s “Sabra and Shatila Massacre”

The mural as a crucial form of political expression (see Rivera), relate to the wall which is attacked by graffiti, the wall whose social relations are made to sing out, to scream out, and announce themselves from concrete. globalwarmist:

Earlier this year, London’s Tate Modern acquired “Sabra and Shatila Massacre” (1982-83), an epic mural-sized drawing by pioneering Iraqi artist Dia al-Azzawi. Sprawling as it is towering and engulfing, the artist began the massive work after news surfaced that between two and three thousand Palestinian and Lebanese civilians were strategically murdered in and around the refugee camps of southern Beirut in 1982. While creating “Sabra and Shatila Massacre,” al-Azzawi was also moved by Jean Genet’s “Four Hours in Shatila,” a written dispatch of the hell on earth that was the site of this civil-war era carnage, the violent details of which are impossible to take in without periodically searching for respite by turning away from the page.
- Dia al-Azzawi’s “Sabra and Shatila Massacre”

The mural as a crucial form of political expression (see Rivera), relate to the wall which is attacked by graffiti, the wall whose social relations are made to sing out, to scream out, and announce themselves from concrete.
    High Resolution

    globalwarmist:

    Earlier this year, London’s Tate Modern acquired “Sabra and Shatila Massacre” (1982-83), an epic mural-sized drawing by pioneering Iraqi artist Dia al-Azzawi. Sprawling as it is towering and engulfing, the artist began the massive work after news surfaced that between two and three thousand Palestinian and Lebanese civilians were strategically murdered in and around the refugee camps of southern Beirut in 1982. While creating “Sabra and Shatila Massacre,” al-Azzawi was also moved by Jean Genet’s “Four Hours in Shatila,” a written dispatch of the hell on earth that was the site of this civil-war era carnage, the violent details of which are impossible to take in without periodically searching for respite by turning away from the page.

    - Dia al-Azzawi’s “Sabra and Shatila Massacre”

    The mural as a crucial form of political expression (see Rivera), relate to the wall which is attacked by graffiti, the wall whose social relations are made to sing out, to scream out, and announce themselves from concrete.

    (via em-al-dood)

  4. "The despondency that follows makes me feel somewhat like a shipwrecked man who spies a sail, sees himself saved, and suddenly remembers that the lens of his spyglass has a flaw, a blurred spot — the sail he has seen."

     -

    Jean Genet, Our Lady of the Flowers (via thethorninhisside)

    Drowning in the endless procession or rather, the endless flow of alienated images that constitute all relations within Specular capitalism.

  5. "My heart’s in my hand, and my hand is pierced, and my hand’s in the bag, and the bag is shut, and my heart is caught."

     -

    Jean Genet, Our Lady of the Flowers (via quotesandnonsense)

    Love: to be pierced, stabbed, wounded, bleeding profusely and often. 

  6. "I wanted to swallow myself by opening my mouth very wide and turning it over my head so that it would take in my whole body, and then the Universe, until all that would remain of me would be a ball of eaten thing which little by little would be annihilated: that is how I see the end of the world."

     -

    Jean Genet -Our Lady of the Flowers.

    Planetary annihilation, the subject eats itself, consuming (in the Marxian sense) the Totality (Totality for dinner!), but Truth cannot be swallowed. Praise to Genet or rather Long Live Genet, who, like Rimbaud, has been eaten by those foul vultures, those relativists and sophists in the English departments of the Western World. They forget his unswerving support for the oppressed and yet they nurse their decrepit discipline on his unceasing Vitality, they have cut him into pathetic portions to be processed by their Deconstructionist Machines and served to their pathetic circle of ‘experts’ (reviewers, students, idiots all) for ‘assessment’. Well the final assessment is in, and they are most certainly Out, out out out you ingrates, Genet will not suffer your de-fanging, he throws you off like a wrestler and slithers out of your slimy grasp. You will not suck his bones any longer, you Shame-faced ‘specialists’. He is for a revolt that will annihilate the annihilators, that will laugh in the face of propriety and ‘academic practice’, the laugh of the criminal and the madman, the laugh of the most joyous Revolutionary, the laugh of those who still Live to tread on tyrants…  

    (Source: benutty)

  7. "I let myself drift, as to the depth of an ocean, to the depths of a dismal neighborhood of hard and opaque but rather light houses, to the inner gaze of memory, for the matter of memory is porous."

     -

    Jean Genet, Our Lady of the Flowers (via theyvcreation)

    Oceanic thought, the psychology of social space and the derive are linked indivisibly in this fragment. 

  8. "Ariadne in the labyrinth. The most alive of worlds, human beings with the tenderest flesh, are made of marble. I strew devastation as I pass. I wander dead-eyed through cities and petrified populations."

     -

    -Jean Genet, Our Lady of the Flowers, trans. Bernard Frechtmann, 130-131. (via femmefag)

    20th century doom is no less resonant in this blighted present.

  9. 
Croatian-born Yugoslav partisan Stjepan Filipović shouts “Death to fascism, freedom to the people!” while about to be hanged by Axis forces

Anti-fascist heroes, we salute you. 
Croatian-born Yugoslav partisan Stjepan Filipović shouts “Death to fascism, freedom to the people!” while about to be hanged by Axis forces

Anti-fascist heroes, we salute you.
    High Resolution

    Croatian-born Yugoslav partisan Stjepan Filipović shouts “Death to fascism, freedom to the people!” while about to be hanged by Axis forces

    Anti-fascist heroes, we salute you.

    (Source: 82-588-0248-8, via theirhelicopterssing-deactivate)

  10. "Man becomes ever poorer as man, his need for money becomes ever greater if he wants to master the hostile power. The power of his money declines in inverse proportion to the increase in the volume of production: that is, his neediness grows as the power of money increases."